Browsing All posts tagged under »loss«

‘A Fine Mess We’re In’: Majority of Cancer Preclinical Research Findings Not Replicable–Childhood Cancer Awareness Month

September 1, 2015 by

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‘The failure to win “the war on cancer” has been blamed on many factors, … But recently a new culprit has emerged: too many basic scientific discoveries… are wrong.’~C. Glenn Begley It’s nothing new. Over 3 decades ago the problem was well-known, as memorialized in the premier journal Science, in its article “Reevaluation of cancer data […]

Pancreatic, Carcinoid, Stomach and Lung Cancer Awareness Month: Beyond “You Are Getting Sleepy”: Cancer and Hynotherapy

November 12, 2014 by

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I’m going to kind of go out on a limb here when I discuss one of the treatments I use for many ailments, but also for cancer, and you may think to yourselves: “That Candida.” But I figure anyone who has stayed with me through my harangue on exercise, my advocating pets and plants for your […]

Embracing Pain: An Alternative Way to Deal With Your Symptoms

October 26, 2014 by

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“Pain can be endured and defeated only if it is embraced. Denied or feared, it grows.” ~ Dean Koontz, Velocity The discomfort relief industry is a multibillion-dollar one. There are medicines to relieve headache, stomach distress, sore throats, back spasms–seems like if there’s a complaint, there’s a medicine meant to treat it. But I can’t […]

Don’t Go It Alone: Illness and Connectedness

October 17, 2014 by

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I’m the only one in my family with a green thumb. I’ve got foster plants from almost every relative, which I’ve nursed back from the vegetative graveyard, and they’ve taken over my house. My husband is quite tolerant of it, given that they infringe on every reading space he tries to carve out for myself. My […]

Getting Good And Angry: How Expressing Anger Just Might Help When It Comes To Cancer

September 22, 2014 by

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Here’s one that screamers, hair-pullers, and dish-throwers alike will appreciate: Turn’s out it’s good for your health to express your anger. Now that may very well be one of those annoying things people come up with as they’re telling you how to live your life, now that they’ve co-opted that right, seeing as you have cancer. […]

Bereavement With Your Name On It: The ‘Unbereaved Bereaved’

September 5, 2014 by

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In the totally bizarre way in which the world–and bereavement–works, sometimes you’re in the right (or should I say wrong?) place, at the right time, to be a mourner you don’t feel yourself to be, in a role you never wanted to play. Of course this is uncommon–and there is no literature on it to confirm […]

I Did It My Way: Different Paths to Adapting to Bereavement

August 22, 2014 by

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I planned each charted course/Each careful step along the byway/And more, much more than this/ I did it my way . . ./I faced it all and I stood tall/And did it my way.” It was the year of the plague. I lost a client, a mere child, to leukemia. A long-standing client dropped dead […]

Not ‘Normal’ Anymore?: Complicated Bereavement

August 14, 2014 by

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I am not just the founding mother, but am also the most decorated member of my children’s fan club. At rallies I come equipped with buttons, balloons and noise-makers, wearing electric blue shirts with the kids’ names inscribed.  I’m a complete embarrassment, but I want my support known. Their spouses can’t hold a candle to […]

It’s Not a Broken Heart: The Biological Bases For Illness and Mortality Post-Bereavement

August 11, 2014 by

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I have nothing against William Cowper. A wildly popular 18th century poet, greater poetic minds than mine–Samuel Coleridge, William Wordsworth–thought he was the cat’s pajamas. But when he leaves his subject base of nature and Christianity and steps his foot into medical theory, well, we have a parting of the minds. “Grief is itself a medicine,” […]

How To Deal With ‘Enquiring Minds’

July 1, 2014 by

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Years ago there was an ad for this incredibly trashy magazine, “The National Enquirer.” It said, “Enquiring minds want to know,” and the camera would pan to an avid reader of the rag, who would look straight into the camera and says, “I want to know.” There may very likely be times during your cancer […]

“Oops, I Think I Did It Again:” Yet Another Misdiagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease

May 22, 2014 by

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The words instill dread in the hearts of the American public. While cancer remains top vote-getter in the frightening arena, with 41% of respondents to a 2011 survey for the MetLife Foundation in 2011 conferring upon it ‘most-feared’ status [see “The Winner on Fear-Factor: Cancer“], Alzheimer’s clocks in at a close second, with 31% of the votes. […]

“Who You Gonna Call?”: Others’ Prayers Impact On Illness, Redux

September 24, 2012 by

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My mother likes to compliment herself on her cooking. “That was truly delicious!” she’ll exclaim, her mouth still full of her last bite of a fancy beef stew. “And I was able to make it during such a hectic day. It’s great to be organized.” Truth is, her cooking is great–but the point is that […]